Realism has meant different things at different times…

Generally speaking, Realism is an intent to portray ordinary contemporary life, with attention to individual and regional eccentricities.

Realism was a movement that was artistic movement. It started in the year of 1850s soon after the 1848 Revolution ended. The Revolution had been dominating literature of the French and the arts from the 18th century whereas Realism with respect to arts was to attempting to represent subject matter in their real form without making use of artificial aspect. Crypto CFD Trader also shows the real trading types.

Modern painters use a direct visual language of current iconography and symbols, inspired by photographic forms – a language easily understood by almost everyone in our culture.

Realism is coming back.

Actually, it never went away, but after 50 years on the periphery, more and more artists are reinvigorating the genre. Today, painters are seeing it as a way to address the experience of living in our complex world, and they are challenging the viewer to consider the forces that are shaping this world, as well as pointing to its beauty.

San Francisco Realism

…has its roots in West Coast Realism, the Bay Area Figurative Movement, and Mural Art. It makes liberal use of humor and frequently employs saturated colors and elements of Pop culture. Its relaxed boundaries encompass the extremes of photographic realism and almost-abstract painterly realism.

“Realism is the foundation of Western Art.
It’ll never go away.
That’s why I went back to it.”
— Dale Erickson

Want to know more?
Ask the artists.
Three Bay Area realist painters will gather at Hang at the Canvas on Thursday, November 21, 2002, at 6pm to talk about Realism, answer your questions, and show their work.

Some Quotes about Realism:

“But to return to the question of the challenge posed by the concept of modernity, for contemporary artists (as it has been across time) it seems not to lie exclusively in the search for new tools and materials, but in the search for expression and idea. At this moment in time a virtually endless range of materials is available to select from to suit the gamut of expressive language, but in the realm of Realism those simple, uncontrived materials which have faithfully served the ineffables of illusionism still stand.”
–Virginia Anne Bonito, revised “Get Real introduction”, April 10, 2000, http://www.artregister.com/seavest.html

“Since the middle of the twentieth century, American abstract expressionism has been celebrated as the art form of the Western world. Some critics have considered such works as the pinnacle of artistic production, calling it “the end of art.” While abstract expressionism has been labeled a uniquely American form, some have re-interpreted it as the culmination of intense European influence over American artists. On the other side of the debate, realism has been called the American artform. Benjamin West, Eakins, and the Ash Can School are seen as the real fathers of American art. In the 1970’s, realism re-emerged in America, but in a manner that paid homage to abstraction. ”
– from the American Abstraction / American Realism: the Great Debate Exhibit at The Susquehanna Art Museum’ http://www.sqart.org/exhibits.html

Even a part of an object has value. A whole new realism resides in the way one envisages an object or one of its parts. (Fernand Leger)

Some people are still unaware that reality contains unparalleled beauties. The fantastic and unexpected, the ever-changing and renewing is nowhere so exemplified as in real life itself. (Berenice Abbott)

What I want to show in my work is the idea which hides itself behind so-called reality. I am seeking for the bridge which leans from the visible to the invisible through reality. It may sound paradoxical, but it is in fact reality which forms the mystery of our existence. (Max Beckmann)

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away. (Philip K. Dick)

The object of art is not to reproduce reality, but to create a reality of the same intensity. (Alberto Giacometti)

A painting is a proposal about what is real. (Harriet Shorr)